A Bride At Last by Melissa Jagears Book Review

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*From the Back Cover*

Abandoned by his mail-order bride, Silas Jonesey has fought an uphill battle to recover from a pattern of poor choices. Now his prayers for reconciliation have finally come true and his estranged wife has contacted him with her whereabouts.

Kate Dawson was supposed to be a mail-order bride, but upon realizing she’d been deceived about her intended groom, she’s now settled into life as a schoolteacher. When the mother of a student passes away, Kate assumes she’ll take on care of nine-year-old Anthony–until two men suddenly show up in town, claiming to be the boy’s father.

Silas can see Anthony loves Kate, so he enlists her help in reaching out to the boy and attempting to prove his paternity to the court. When a common interest in Anthony leads to an interest in each other and Silas and Kate begin to think they can overcome their rocky start, neither is prepared for the secrets and past hurts that have yet to come to light. Can Silas, Kate, and Anthony’s wounded souls bind them together or will all that stands between them leave them lonely forever?

Book Review

This book is a beautiful romance story. One I will remember for years to come. Kate and Silas meet under strange circumstance, his wife, who abandoned him seven years before, has recently passed away, but before that she sent a letter begging him for money. A boy named Anthony, who has become Miss Kate Dawson’s ward upon his mother’s death is the middle of a custody battle between Kate, Silas (who claims to be his father, but there is no evidence pointing to it), and Richard (a drunken man who beat Anthony and his late mother). But when the judge rules, Anthony vanishes, Kate and Silas spend days looking for him. This is the start of both Kate and Silas finding out that they have much more in common than either realized. This book is interesting from page one and never slacks on the pace. I found it difficult to put down. It would be a great poolside read (or beach read!)!

***FTC DISCLAIMER*** I received an advance copy of this book, for my honest review. However, all opinions are my own.

link to litfuse campaign page: http://litfusegroup.com/campaigns/a-bride-at-last-melissa-jagears

A Worthy Pursuit Book Review

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(**from the back cover**) – www.amazon.com

A teacher on the run. A bounty hunter in pursuit. Can two enemies learn to trust each other before they both lose what they hold most dear?

Stone Hammond is the best tracker in Texas. He never comes home empty-handed. So when a wealthy railroad investor hires him to find his abducted granddaughter, Stone eagerly accepts.

Charlotte Atherton, former headmistress of Sullivan’s Academy for Exceptional Youths, will do anything to keep her charges safe, especially the orphaned girl entrusted to her care. Charlotte promised Lily’s mother she’d keep the girl away from her unscrupulous grandfather, and nothing will stop Charlotte from fulfilling that pledge. Not even the handsome bounty hunter with surprisingly honest eyes who comes looking for them.

When Miss Atherton produces documentation that shows her to be Lily’s legal guardian, Stone must reevaluate everything he’s been led to believe. Is she villain or victim?

Then a new danger forces Charlotte to trust the man sent to destroy her. Stone vows to protect what he once sought to tear apart. Besides, he’s ready to start a new pursuit: winning Charlotte’s heart.

BOOK REVIEW

This was the first Karen Witemeyer book I have read, and it was a great one! The strong female characters really appealed to me.  The children as main characters really made this book though, hands down the best moments in the book. It rounds out at over 200 pages, but I finished it within 6 hours, it was that good and hard to put down! As this was the first Witemeyer book I have read, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but my expectations were definitely surpassed and I will read many of her books in the years to come. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who likes Witemeyer’s writing, someone looking for a great poolside read for the summer, or just someone looking for a book to read. It will stay on my keep shelf for years to come!

****FTC Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher, in exchange for my honest review, however all opinions are my own!***

Legend Book Review

legend

*** from the front flap*** (www.amazon.com)

The unforgettable account and courageous actions of the U.S. Army’s 240th Assault Helicopter Company and Green Beret Staff Sergeant Roy Benavidez, who risked everything to rescue a Special Forces team trapped behind enemy lines.

This was an excellent read, one that I won’t soon forget. It was an outstandingly written account of one of the many Black Ops / Covert Missions that occurred during the Vietnam War. I am a history student, but my focus is in Tudor England, so I mostly spend my days surrounded by ghosts of years past. This book brought into sharp perspective the true sacrifices that were made during that time in our nation, as well as the effects of the soldiers involved in the conflict. The author does an excellent job of telling Staff Sergeant Roy Benavidez’s story. Also the author allows the reader to get to know the other Americans involved in the “Daniel Boone Mission”. This book is one that will stay on my keep shelf, and it offers great insight into one of the many special forces missions and sacrifices in the Vietnam War. This is a great read for anyone interested in military history!

*** the FTC now requires book reviewers to note when they have received a book from a publisher: I received this book from Blogging for Books, but all opinions and suggestions are my own!***

If you would like to find out more about Blogging for Books you can visit their website at http://www.bloggingforbooks.com

If you would like to find out how to purchase the book: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/235411/legend-by-eric-blehm/

Solomon’s Song Book Review

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*** from the back cover*** (www.goodreads.com)

When drought and famine strike Judea, David’s people wonder if he has become too old to rule. Solomon and his mother, Bathsheba, are sent to find a new addition to David’s harem. During their search, Solomon falls in love with Shulamit, only to have her chosen as his father’s bride. Solomon is heartbroken, but Bathsheba has plans of her own.

Book Review

This is the first Roberta Kells Dorr book I have read, and I can tell you it won’t be the last. The story was riveting and kept me engaged all the way through, in fact I loved the story so much, I read the entire book in one day!

It was if I had been swept back into time, Dorr manages to make the reader feel actively engaged throughout the entire story. I felt as if I was going through the story with the characters themselves. One of the greatest love stories I have ever read, in fact I think I like Solomon and his love, better than I like Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy literarily, of course.

This book has a rare quality to it that would appeal to even the most grievous of judgers. It doesn’t deviate from Biblical facts as much as other Biblical fiction, that being said, the reader does need to remember that it is fiction, wonderfully and beautifully crafted fiction, but fiction none the less. Dorr manages to weave one of the most beloved stories in the Bible into a beautiful and romantic love story. This book will remain on my keep shelf for years to come and will be read over and over again.

FTC Disclaimer:

*** the FTC now requires book reviewers to note when they have received a book from a publisher: I received this book from Moody Publishers, but all opinions and suggestions are my own!***

Seven Revolutions Book Review

**from the front flap** (from www.christianbook.com)

In Seven Revolutions, authors Mike Aquilina and James Papandrea examine the practices of the early Church – a body of Christians living in the Roman Empire – and show how the lessons learned can apply to Christians living in the United States today. Through expert storytelling and historical insight, the authors show just how revolutionary Christians were against the backdrop of ancient Rome, and just how revolutionary we can be today.

REVIEW

This was a fascinating read for me as a newly confirmed Catholic. Mike Aquilina is a great author and a well spring of information on Christianity and especially Catholicism. This book was one of the most insightful and inspiring books I have read this year in my journey to becoming a Catholic. Each of the “Seven Revolutions” has its own dedicated chapter, and really dives into depth with that discussion of the specific revolution being presented in that chapter. This book is a great read, and one that I would highly recommend to anyone interested in learning more about Christianity, Catholic Church doctrine. Seven Revolutions also poses a unique look at early – Christian Rome and the culture that surrounded that period of history. This book was intriguing for me as a history major and it is one that will stay in my re-read pile for years to come.

Disclosure (for book reviews) – The FTC requires book reviewers to disclose the following: Book reviews will appear regularly on this site. There are books that I have purchased myself or borrowed from the library, I will note this. However, I do occasionally receive books, at no cost, in exchange for a fair and balanced review with no other compensation provided. – I received this book Seven Revolutions from Blogging for Books – you can visit their website at www.bloggingforbooks.com

The Pharaoh’s Daughter Book Review

Pharaoh's Daughter

**from the front flap** www.mesuandrews.com

Anippe has grown up in the shadows of Egypt’s good god Pharaoh, aware that Anubis, god of the afterlife, may take her or her siblings at any moment. She watched him snatch her mother and infant brother during childbirth, a moment which awakens in her a terrible dread of ever bearing a child. Now she is to be become the bride of Sebak, a kind but quick-tempered Captain of Pharaoh Tut’s army. In order to provide Sebak the heir he deserves and yet protect herself from the underworld gods, Anippe must launch a series of deceptions, even involving the Hebrew midwives—women ordered by Tut to drown the sons of their own people in the Nile.

When she finds a baby floating in a basket on the great river, Anippe believes Egypt’s gods have answered her pleas, entrenching her more deeply in deception and placing her and her son Mehy, whom handmaiden Miriam calls Moses, in mortal danger.

As bloodshed and savage politics shift the balance of power in Egypt, the gods reveal their fickle natures and Anippe wonders if her son, a boy of Hebrew blood, could one day become king. Or does the god of her Hebrew servants, the one they call El Shaddai, have a different plan—for them all?

REVIEW:

I’ve read Christian fiction for as long as I can remember, but never have I really delved into the world of Biblical fiction, until this book – and boy what a fun experience it was. Mesu Andrew’s other books are next up on my “what I’m currently reading list!”

Anippe knows that life is short, her experiences have taught her that. But when a wailing baby in a basket is found washed up next to her bathhouse wall, she knows she must take him in and pass him off as her son, or be forced to bear a child herself [ her ultimate fear]. While Anippe’s husband is away fighting a war, she devises a complete deception of everyone but a select few people. Mesu Andrews weaves a stunning tale of the origins of Baby Moses and his Egyptian mother, or Ummi Anippe as she is called. Andrews keeps the Word of God in high regard throughout the book, but offers readers a fresh perspective on an age old story.

As her family is torn from her by God of the Underworld Anubis, Anippe learns that maybe there is a higher God than the ones the Ancient Egyptians worshipped. The one her Hebrew slaves speak of. If you are a fan of excellently written historical fiction, this book is for you. I would recommend it to any reader who is looking for some fictional insight into the world of Moses, or just a great book!

Disclosure (for book reviews) – The FTC requires book reviewers to disclose the following: Book reviews will appear regularly on this site. There are books that I have purchased myself or borrowed from the library, I will note this. However, I do occasionally receive books, at no cost, in exchange for a fair and balanced review with no other compensation provided. – I received this book The Pharaoh’s Daughter from Blogging for Books – you can visit their website at www.bloggingforbooks.com

The Red Tent – Anita Diamant Review

The Red Tent Review

The Red Tent by Anita Diamant

**from the front flap**

Her name is Dinah. In the Bible, her life is only hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the more familiar chapters of the Book of Genesis that are about her father, Jacob, and his dozen sons. Told in Dinah’s voice, this novel reveals the traditions and turmoils of ancient womanhood – the world of the red tent.

REVIEW

Jacob had dozens of sons but only one daughter, Dinah, who had as she describes four mothers, Leah, Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah – Leah and Rachel were Jacob’s two wives – Zilpah and Bilhah his concubines. Dinah in reality was the only daughter of Leah, Jacobs first wife. This book, first published in 1997, lends a very interesting take on the early chapters of Genesis in the Bible. Dinah grows up, and is called to be a midwife, separated from her family by a violent event, she makes her own way in the world. This story could be interpreted as rape, and it often departs from the Biblical basis. Dinah’s story is told in a single chapter in Genesis. But when you as a reader remember that this book is a work of fiction, and set aside the room for interpretation, an amazing story unfolds – one that is unparalled almost 20 years after the original publication. All in all I give the book 3.5 stars. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a well written read.

***FTC DISCLOSURE*** – The FTC requires book reviewers to  disclose  the following: Book reviews will appear regularly on this site. There are books that I have purchased myself or borrowed from the library, I will note this. However, I do occasionally receive books, at no cost, in exchange for a fair and balanced review with no other compensation provided.